Harry Potter London walk Directions.

Backtrack past the Anchor Tavern and go left along Clink Street.

On the right is the entrance to the Clink Prison Museum.

CLINK STREET AND THE CLINK PRISON MUSEUM

In the Middle Ages the area hereabouts was known as the Liberty of the Clink and was owned by the Bishops of Winchester.

Medieval law was very uneven and was largely a matter for the feudal lord who ruled a particular district. It was in their capacity as secular lords that the Bishops ruled Bankside and turned it into London's chief pleasure district. Here were located the gambling dens, bull and bear baiting pits and the brothels.

Being the landlords of such a colourful but dangerous area the Bishop's found it necessary to operate a prison for offenders against such law and order as they chose to impose and thus the Clink Prison came in to being. Although a prison was probably established within the palace in the 12th century, the first mention of the clink was in 1509. Later, in his monumental Survey of London , published in 1598, John Stow (1525 -1605) states that the prison was kept for those that broke the peace in the Bankside brothels.

In 1761 it was described as 'a very dismal hole where debtors are sometimes confined, but little used.' Nineteen years later it was burned down in the Gordon Riots of 1780 after which it was not rebuilt.

Its name, however, has survived in the word 'clink' which immediately conjures up images of prison or of incarceration.

An exhibition of the gaol's history is located on the right.

Walk Directions.

Keep ahead along Clink Street.

Proceed ahead in to Pickford's Wharf where on the right are the

REMAINS OF WINCHESTER PALACE
LONDON RESIDENCE OF THE BISHOPS OF WINCHESTER.

This was once the Great Hall of Winchester Palace, the residence of the powerful Bishops of Winchester.

Remains of Winchester Palace.

The palace was originally built in 1109 for the then Bishop of Winchester William Giffard.

The last Bishop of Winchester to live at the Palace was Lancelot Andrewes (1555-1626) who oversaw the compilation of the Authorised Version (also known as the King James Version) of the Bible.

During the English Civil War (1642-48) Winchester Palace was taken over by Parliament for use as a prison for Royalist soldiers, and was later sold for warehousing.

It was never, technically speaking, demolished, but rather slowly disappeared in the redevelopment of the warehouses.

The movement of London's shipping further down the river in the 1970's led to a wholescale redevelopment of the area, in the course of which these late 14th century ruins were exposed to public view.

LONDON TREASURE HUNT CHALLENGE SIXTEEN
Who's missing?
A treasure hunt clue showing Winchester Palace cellar.

Tour Directions

Keep ahead until you arrive at:-

THE REPLICA OF THE GOLDEN HINDE
SIR FRANCIS DRAKE

The Golden Hinde.

This replica of Sir Francis Drake’s flagship, The Golden Hind is now a floating museum.

Feted as a hero in England, Drake was, not surprisingly, accused of all manner of foul deeds by his arch enemies, the Spanish, whose Armada he so devastatingly defeated in 1588 (helped more than a little by atrocious weather conditions!)

Rumour was rife that Drake had sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for prowess at sea, and that, in concert with Devon witches, he had cast spells to raise the storms that shattered the Spanish Armada.

The replica is open to the public. On board, costumed guides will tell you all about 16th-century seafaring life, although talk of the Devil may be slightly frowned upon!

THE LEGEND OF JOHN OVERS
ST MARY OVERIE DOCK

The Golden Hinde is berthed in St Mary Overie Dock around the origins of which an intriguing legend has been woven.

Long before any bridge spanned the Thames, a ferryman named John Overs had the monopoly of ferrying cargoes and passengers across the river, and in the process he became immensely wealthy.

But he was also a tight-fisted miser.

His servants were treated very badly, and his only daughter, Mary, was forbidden to marry the man she loved because her father refused to provide a dowry.

John Overs the miserly Ferryman.

One day it occurred to John Overs that, if he pretended to be dead for twenty-four hours, his household would mourn, and their fasting would save him the cost of a day’s food.

He therefore wrapped himself in a burial shroud, laid himself in a coffin in his chamber, and prepared to increase his fortune.

But he had misjudged his servants, for when they heard the old skinflint was dead they unlocked the pantry and held a lavish party to celebrate.

John Overs lay still for as long as he could. But eventually he could take it no more and, with a roar of anger, sat up to admonish his ungrateful employees.

One of the servants took fright and, ‘thinking the devil was rising’ in his master’s likeness, picked up an oar and ‘struck out his brains’.

Although saddened at her father’s tragic demise, Mary sent word to her lover that they could now be married, and he raced to plight his troth. But he was killed when his horse stumbled and threw him.

Mary was now inundated with offers of marriage. But she chose instead to found the priory of St Mary Overie, and here lived out the remainder of her days.

The legend can be read on a grey granite plaque embedded into a wall recess to the left of the Golden Hinde as you face it.

To The Next Location

Turn right in front of the Golden Hinde and keep ahead. On your left is the entrance to:-

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL

Reputedly this stands on the site where Mary founded her Priory. Legend aside there was certainly a 'monasterium' here at the time of the Domesday survey. In 1106 a new church was founded as the Augustinian Priory of St Mary Overie (overie means 'over the river') and fragments of this church still remain.

At the Reformation and Dissolution of the Monasteries (1537 - 1539) the surrounding Monastic buildings were demolished and the church became the parish church of St. Saviour at Southwark, the name by which it was known to both William Shakespeare and Charles Dickens.

Dickens makes reference to it in an essay entitled 'City of London Churches' in his London travelogue The Uncommercial Traveller.

I know the church of Old Gower's tomb (he lies with his head upon his books) to be the church of St Saviour's Southwark.

John Gower's tomb Southwark Cathedral.

The memorial to John Gower(1330-1408) that Dickens refers to is located in the cathedral's north aisle. Gower is often referred to as the "first English poet" since, when authors were writing in Latin or French, he also wrote in the Middle English of his day.

Gower was a friend of Geoffrey Chaucer(1343 - 1400) and the two poets held great respect for each other. Chaucer part-dedicated his Troilus and Criseyde to "moral Gower", whilst Gower, at the end of his Confessio Amantis has Venus give a speech eulogising Chaucer.

Gower spent the latter years of his life living in rooms at the Priory of St Mary Overie. He left money for the founding of the chantry chapel in which he was buried, and although the chapel was later destroyed, his ostentatious tomb can still be seen close to where it was located.His recumbent effigy is shown with his head resting on his three works: Vox Clamantis (in Latin), Speculum Meditantis (in French) and Confessio Amantis (in Middle English).

In the south aisle of the cathedral is a memorial erected in 1912 to William Shakespeare. Behind the somewhat clumsy statue of an uncomfortably reclining bard is a frieze depicting what the area looked like in Shakespeare's day. The window above the memorial shows various characters from his plays and is divided into the comedies, histories and tragedies.

Although Shakespeare is not buried here (he lies at Holy Trinity Church Stratford-Upon-Avon) his youngest brother Edward, 'a player base born', was interred at the church following his death, probably from plague, in December 1607. Although the site of his grave is long lost there is a memorial stone to him set in to the floor of the St Saviour choir.

In 1905 the diocese of Southwark was created and the church containing the cathedra of the Bishop of Southwark became Southwark Cathedral. It is a very active community church that campaigns on many social issues, and was especially actively involved with the cause for the ordination of women.

Next Stop

Keep ahead along Cathedral Street and, just under the railway bridge, go right and keep ahead through Borough Market.

On arrival at the other side pause outside the Market Porter Pub.

LONDON TREASURE HUNT CHALLENGE SEVENTEEN
SPOT THE DIFFERENCE
Treasure hunt clue at Market Porter.

Directions

Go left along Stoney Street and pause under the railway bridge where on the right is Chez Michelle.

THE LEAKY CAULDRON IN
HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN.
Chez Michele which features on the Harry Potter London walk.

It is outside the doorway under the bridge on the right that the Knight Bus screeches to a halt causing the alarm of a parked car to go off. Harry then climbs off and the bus speeds away leaving Harry to be shown in to the Leaky Cauldron.

Although this is where the exterior shot was filmed, the interior was a film set so there isn't a great deal more here to detain you!

THE NEXT SECTION OF THE HARRY POTTER LOCATIONS TOUR
TAKES YOU TO DIAGON ALLEY AND ANOTHER LEAKY CAULDRON!
OR WAVE YOUR WAND OVER THIS LINK TO
RETURN TO THE HARRY POTTER TOUR.